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Fauci says U.S. political divisions contributed to 500,000 dead from COVID-19

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CHICAGO — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said political divisiveness contributed significantly to the “stunning” U.S. COVID-19 death toll, which on Monday surpassed 500,000 lives lost.

The country had recorded more than 28 million COVID-19 cases and 500,054 fatalities as of Monday afternoon, according to a Reuters tally of public health data.

In an interview with Reuters, Fauci on Monday said the pandemic arrived in the United States as the country was riven by political divisions in which wearing a mask became a political statement rather than a public health measure.

“Even under the best of circumstances, this would have been a very serious problem,” Fauci said, noting that despite strong adherence to public health measures, countries such as Germany and the UK struggled with the virus.

“However, that does not explain how a rich and sophisticated country can have the most percentage of deaths and be the hardest-hit country in the world,” said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a top adviser to President Joe Biden.

“That I believe should not have happened.”

While the United States has just about 4% of the global population, it has recorded nearly 20% of all COVID-19 deaths.

“This is the worst thing that’s happened to this country with regard to the health of the nation in over 100 years,” Fauci said, adding that decades from now, people will be talking about “that horrible year of 2020, and maybe 2021.”

For most of 2020, Fauci served on then President Donald Trump’s White House Coronavirus Task Force, a job that often put him at odds with the president, who sought to downplay the severity of pandemic despite contracting COVID-19 himself, and refused to issue a national mask mandate.

Trump at times even attacked Fauci’s credibility, undermining his public health messaging.

The nation’s failure cannot all be laid at the feet of Donald Trump, Fauci said.

“But the lack of involvement at the very top of the leadership in trying to do everything that was science-based was clearly detrimental to the effort.”

His personal low point came when several states and cities disregarded the Task Force’s phased recommendations for how to safely reopen the country after spring lockdowns.

He called that disregard by several governors and mayors “incomprehensible to me (when) you could see right in front of your eyes what was happening.”

“When the American spirit is so divided, that really, really made me sad,” he said.

Fauci said the emergence of more contagious variants of the coronavirus, especially ones from South Africa and Brazil that have been shown to reduce the immunity from natural infections and vaccines, have made it challenging to predict when the nation will be able to put the pandemic behind it.

Fauci and Biden have said the United States should return to something approaching pre-pandemic normal life around Christmas. That could change, he cautioned.

The variants also change the equation when it comes to herd immunity, in which a population becomes protected from infection because of high levels of immunity from vaccines or infections.

Asked whether that is still achievable, Fauci said, “I think we can get herd immunity at least against getting sick.”

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/international/20210223/fauci-says-us-political-divisions-contributed-to-500000-dead-from-covid19/59414.html

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Lexus chief to take over Toyota as founder’s grandson steps down

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TOKYO — Toyota’s chief executive will step down as head of the company his grandfather founded, the automaker said on Thursday, handing over to the leader of its Lexus luxury brand as the Japanese giant struggles to meet the shift to electric vehicles.

The 53-year-old chief branding officer and president of Toyota Motor Corp’s Lexus brand, Koji Sato, will take over from April 1 when Akio Toyoda becomes chairman, it said.

The issue of who would take over the top spot at Toyota – Japan’s biggest company and one of the world’s most influential manufacturers – has been an increasing focus for investors. But the timing of the announcement was a surprise.

Under the 66-year-old Toyoda, who led the company for more than a decade, the automaker has appeared reluctant to embrace electric vehicles, arguing the hybrid technology it pioneered with its once market-leading Prius was a better fit for many drivers.

It also touted hydrogen-powered cars as the future, raising fears it would be left behind by the rise of electric vehicles, as the flashier and more nimble Tesla Inc eclipsed it in both innovation and share price.

That insistence on hybrids and hydrogen also prompted criticism from investors and environmental activists who once widely praised Toyota’s technology and emissions record.

“No doubt Mr. Toyoda has been a competent CEO, but the whole auto sector needs to make disruptive change and Toyota has been lagging in this in our view, so this could be chance for a fresh start,” said Anders Schelde, chief investment officer of Danish pension fund AkademikerPension, which has repeatedly pressed Toyota to accelerate its shift to electric vehicles.

“We are hopeful this could help Toyota to set a new direction, but it remains to be seen.”

The succession announcement was broadcast on a webcast through the automaker’s Toyota Times channel in what looked more like a stilted talk show with a host rather than a formal corporate announcement.

“The timing of this was a surprise,” said Seiji Sugiura, an analyst at Tokai Tokyo Research Institute, who noted there may have been a “sense of stagnation” inside the company given recent pressure on the share price.

“Probably, the day-to-day management will not change. Having Akio Toyoda step away from being CEO may increase his symbolism within the company and it may be hard for the young, new president to really show his hand.”

There was also little mention of concrete corporate strategy or investment priorities to come. Toyoda said Sato’s mission would be to transform Toyota into a “mobility company,” without specifying what that would entail.

“The CEO needs youth, energy, strength,” Toyoda said, saying that he himself was now a “relic” of an older generation. In Sato, too, he said, he had chosen a fellow car aficionado.

‘Baton touch’

Toyoda described the hand-off as a “baton touch” in leadership, but the staged event highlighted his continued central role. He turned from time to time to offer instruction and reminders to Sato.

Sato said Toyoda had offered him the CEO job at the end of the year when both were in Thailand for an event to celebrate Toyota’s 60th anniversary of operations there.

“I didn’t know how to respond,” Sato recalled. “I thought it was a joke.”

One Toyota executive, who asked not to be identified, said the automaker was headed for a period of “cloistered rule,” referring to the period in Japan’s history when a retired emperor continued to call the shots.

During his more than a decade at the top, Toyoda presided over the carmaker during a period of intense change in the industry and rising uncertainty about how legacy automakers can fend off the challenge from newer challengers such as Tesla.

Toyoda, speaking at a news conference, said his term at the helm of Toyota started in 2009 with “crisis after crisis” from the effects of a global recession, to Toyota’s recalls and safety crisis to the disruptions that followed the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in northern Japan.

At a shareholder meeting in June last year, Toyoda said he was “thinking about timing and the selection of a successor” when asked about his future.

On Thursday, he said Sato was chosen because he “worked hard” to learn Toyota’s philosophy.

Sato started his career at Toyota in 1992, before rising through the ranks to become chief engineer of Lexus International, a luxury auto brand of Toyota, in 2016, according to his profile on the company’s website.

He has held positions as the president of Lexus International and Gazoo Racing Company, Toyota’s motorsport brand, since 2020. He also took on an executive role at Toyota and became its chief branding officer in January 2021.

Philip Craven, a Toyota director, said in a recorded video statement that the board had reviewed and approved the succession plan put forward by Toyoda and the outgoing chairman, Takeshi Uchiyamada.

TOKYO — Toyota’s chief executive will step down as head of the company his grandfather founded, the automaker said on Thursday, handing over to the leader of its Lexus luxury brand as the Japanese giant struggles to meet the shift to electric vehicles.

The 53-year-old chief branding officer and president of Toyota Motor Corp’s Lexus brand, Koji Sato, will take over from April 1 when Akio Toyoda becomes chairman, it said.

The issue of who would take over the top spot at Toyota – Japan’s biggest company and one of the world’s most influential manufacturers – has been an increasing focus for investors. But the timing of the announcement was a surprise.

Under the 66-year-old Toyoda, who led the company for more than a decade, the automaker has appeared reluctant to embrace electric vehicles, arguing the hybrid technology it pioneered with its once market-leading Prius was a better fit for many drivers.

It also touted hydrogen-powered cars as the future, raising fears it would be left behind by the rise of electric vehicles, as the flashier and more nimble Tesla Inc eclipsed it in both innovation and share price.

That insistence on hybrids and hydrogen also prompted criticism from investors and environmental activists who once widely praised Toyota’s technology and emissions record.

“No doubt Mr. Toyoda has been a competent CEO, but the whole auto sector needs to make disruptive change and Toyota has been lagging in this in our view, so this could be chance for a fresh start,” said Anders Schelde, chief investment officer of Danish pension fund AkademikerPension, which has repeatedly pressed Toyota to accelerate its shift to electric vehicles.

“We are hopeful this could help Toyota to set a new direction, but it remains to be seen.”

The succession announcement was broadcast on a webcast through the automaker’s Toyota Times channel in what looked more like a stilted talk show with a host rather than a formal corporate announcement.

“The timing of this was a surprise,” said Seiji Sugiura, an analyst at Tokai Tokyo Research Institute, who noted there may have been a “sense of stagnation” inside the company given recent pressure on the share price.

“Probably, the day-to-day management will not change. Having Akio Toyoda step away from being CEO may increase his symbolism within the company and it may be hard for the young, new president to really show his hand.”

There was also little mention of concrete corporate strategy or investment priorities to come. Toyoda said Sato’s mission would be to transform Toyota into a “mobility company,” without specifying what that would entail.

“The CEO needs youth, energy, strength,” Toyoda said, saying that he himself was now a “relic” of an older generation. In Sato, too, he said, he had chosen a fellow car aficionado.

‘Baton touch’

Toyoda described the hand-off as a “baton touch” in leadership, but the staged event highlighted his continued central role. He turned from time to time to offer instruction and reminders to Sato.

Sato said Toyoda had offered him the CEO job at the end of the year when both were in Thailand for an event to celebrate Toyota’s 60th anniversary of operations there.

“I didn’t know how to respond,” Sato recalled. “I thought it was a joke.”

One Toyota executive, who asked not to be identified, said the automaker was headed for a period of “cloistered rule,” referring to the period in Japan’s history when a retired emperor continued to call the shots.

During his more than a decade at the top, Toyoda presided over the carmaker during a period of intense change in the industry and rising uncertainty about how legacy automakers can fend off the challenge from newer challengers such as Tesla.

Toyoda, speaking at a news conference, said his term at the helm of Toyota started in 2009 with “crisis after crisis” from the effects of a global recession, to Toyota’s recalls and safety crisis to the disruptions that followed the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in northern Japan.

At a shareholder meeting in June last year, Toyoda said he was “thinking about timing and the selection of a successor” when asked about his future.

On Thursday, he said Sato was chosen because he “worked hard” to learn Toyota’s philosophy.

Sato started his career at Toyota in 1992, before rising through the ranks to become chief engineer of Lexus International, a luxury auto brand of Toyota, in 2016, according to his profile on the company’s website.

He has held positions as the president of Lexus International and Gazoo Racing Company, Toyota’s motorsport brand, since 2020. He also took on an executive role at Toyota and became its chief branding officer in January 2021.

Philip Craven, a Toyota director, said in a recorded video statement that the board had reviewed and approved the succession plan put forward by Toyoda and the outgoing chairman, Takeshi Uchiyamada.

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/international/20230127/lexus-chief-to-take-over-toyota-as-founder-s-grandson-steps-down/71146.html

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Climate tipping points in Amazon, Tibet ‘linked’: scientists

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Climate extremes in the Amazon rainforest are directly affecting those in the Tibetan Plateau, scientists said Thursday, warning that the Himalayan region crucial for the water security of millions was close to a potentially disastrous “tipping point”.

Planet-heating pollution from human activities is raising global temperatures and scientists have said this is pushing crucial ecosystems and whole regions towards often irreversible changes.

Vulnerable areas include melting polar ice sheets that could cause metres of sea-level rise, as well as the Amazon basin, where tropical forests are at risk of turning into savannah.

But can one tipping point have a domino effect on another region? Recent research suggests this is already happening.

Climate-driven changes in the Amazon basin have knock-on effects on the Tibetan Plateau 20,000 kilometres (12,500 miles) away, scientists in China, Europe and Israel reported in Nature Climate Change earlier this month.

“We’ve been surprised to see how strongly climate extremes in the Amazon are connected to climate extremes in Tibet,” said co-author Jurgen Kurths from Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

The researchers used global near-surface temperature data over the last 40 years to map out a pathway of climate links. They stretched from South America to Southern Africa, on to the Middle East and finally into the Tibetan Plateau.

In their study, the researchers then used computer simulations to track how global warming might change these long-distance link-ups out to 2100.

They found that when it gets warmer in the Amazon, temperatures also rise in Tibet. But when rain increases in the South American rainforest, snowfall decreases in the Himalayan region, sometimes called the “third pole”.

‘Tipping cascades’

Using snow cover data, the scientists also detected what they say are early warnings the Tibetan Plateau has been approaching a tipping point of its own since 2008.

The Tibetan Plateau supplies a substantial proportion of the water needs of almost two billion people across South Asia, Southeast Asia and China.

Research published in Nature Climate Change last year said climate change could deplete terrestrial water storage over the Tibetan Plateau, which may ultimately threaten water availability downstream.

Other studies have shown a warming trend in recent decades in the region which — like the Arctic region — is warming two to three times faster than the global average.

But Kurths said the proximity to a potential point-of-no-return transition had been “overlooked so far”.

The researchers said that while their study suggests a heightened risk of “tipping cascades” it was unlikely that the climate system as a whole would flip into a new state.

“Yet, over time, sub-continental tipping events can severely affect entire societies and threaten important parts of the biosphere,” said co-author Hans Joachim Schellnhuber from PIK.

“This is a risk we should rather avoid.”

To avoid the worst impacts of warming, countries have agreed to keep temperatures from rising above the limit of well below two degrees Celsius since the mid-1900s, and preferably below 1.5C.

For that to be achieved, planet-heating greenhouse gas emissions, mainly from fossil fuels, must decline some 45 percent compared to 2020 levels by the end of this decade, and to net zero by mid-century, according to the UN’s climate science advisory body.

Climate extremes in the Amazon rainforest are directly affecting those in the Tibetan Plateau, scientists said Thursday, warning that the Himalayan region crucial for the water security of millions was close to a potentially disastrous “tipping point”.

Planet-heating pollution from human activities is raising global temperatures and scientists have said this is pushing crucial ecosystems and whole regions towards often irreversible changes.

Vulnerable areas include melting polar ice sheets that could cause metres of sea-level rise, as well as the Amazon basin, where tropical forests are at risk of turning into savannah.

But can one tipping point have a domino effect on another region? Recent research suggests this is already happening.

Climate-driven changes in the Amazon basin have knock-on effects on the Tibetan Plateau 20,000 kilometres (12,500 miles) away, scientists in China, Europe and Israel reported in Nature Climate Change earlier this month.

“We’ve been surprised to see how strongly climate extremes in the Amazon are connected to climate extremes in Tibet,” said co-author Jurgen Kurths from Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

The researchers used global near-surface temperature data over the last 40 years to map out a pathway of climate links. They stretched from South America to Southern Africa, on to the Middle East and finally into the Tibetan Plateau.

In their study, the researchers then used computer simulations to track how global warming might change these long-distance link-ups out to 2100.

They found that when it gets warmer in the Amazon, temperatures also rise in Tibet. But when rain increases in the South American rainforest, snowfall decreases in the Himalayan region, sometimes called the “third pole”.

‘Tipping cascades’

Using snow cover data, the scientists also detected what they say are early warnings the Tibetan Plateau has been approaching a tipping point of its own since 2008.

The Tibetan Plateau supplies a substantial proportion of the water needs of almost two billion people across South Asia, Southeast Asia and China.

Research published in Nature Climate Change last year said climate change could deplete terrestrial water storage over the Tibetan Plateau, which may ultimately threaten water availability downstream.

Other studies have shown a warming trend in recent decades in the region which — like the Arctic region — is warming two to three times faster than the global average.

But Kurths said the proximity to a potential point-of-no-return transition had been “overlooked so far”.

The researchers said that while their study suggests a heightened risk of “tipping cascades” it was unlikely that the climate system as a whole would flip into a new state.

“Yet, over time, sub-continental tipping events can severely affect entire societies and threaten important parts of the biosphere,” said co-author Hans Joachim Schellnhuber from PIK.

“This is a risk we should rather avoid.”

To avoid the worst impacts of warming, countries have agreed to keep temperatures from rising above the limit of well below two degrees Celsius since the mid-1900s, and preferably below 1.5C.

For that to be achieved, planet-heating greenhouse gas emissions, mainly from fossil fuels, must decline some 45 percent compared to 2020 levels by the end of this decade, and to net zero by mid-century, according to the UN’s climate science advisory body.

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/international/20230127/climate-tipping-points-in-amazon-tibet-linked-scientists/71143.html

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Archaeologist hails possibly ‘oldest’ mummy yet found in Egypt

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CAIRO — Egyptologists have uncovered a Pharaonic tomb near the capital Cairo containing what may be the oldest and “most complete” mummy yet to be discovered in the country, the excavation team leader said on Thursday.

The 4,300-year-old mummy was found at the bottom of a 15-metre shaft in a recently uncovered group of fifth and sixth dynasty tombs near the Step Pyramid at Saqqara, Zahi Hawass, director of the team, told reporters.

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of new discoveries in Gisr el-Mudir in Saqqara, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of new discoveries in Gisr el-Mudir in Saqqara, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

The mummy, of a man named Hekashepes, was in a limestone sarcophagus that had been sealed in mortar.

An artifact is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An artifact is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

“This mummy may be the oldest and most complete mummy found in Egypt to date,” Hawass, one of Egypt’s former ministers of antiquities, said in a statement.

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Among other tombs found was one belonging to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of officials, a supervisor of nobles and a priest during the reign of Unas, last pharaoh of the fifth dynasty. It was decorated with scenes of daily life.

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Another tomb belonged to Meri, “keeper of the secrets and assistant to the great leader of the palace”.

A statue is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A statue is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Numerous statues were found among the tombs, including one representing a man and his wife and several servants, the statement said.

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

CAIRO — Egyptologists have uncovered a Pharaonic tomb near the capital Cairo containing what may be the oldest and “most complete” mummy yet to be discovered in the country, the excavation team leader said on Thursday.

The 4,300-year-old mummy was found at the bottom of a 15-metre shaft in a recently uncovered group of fifth and sixth dynasty tombs near the Step Pyramid at Saqqara, Zahi Hawass, director of the team, told reporters.

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of new discoveries in Gisr el-Mudir in Saqqara, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of new discoveries in Gisr el-Mudir in Saqqara, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

The mummy, of a man named Hekashepes, was in a limestone sarcophagus that had been sealed in mortar.

An artifact is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An artifact is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

“This mummy may be the oldest and most complete mummy found in Egypt to date,” Hawass, one of Egypt’s former ministers of antiquities, said in a statement.

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

An Egyptian archaeologist restores antiquities after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Among other tombs found was one belonging to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of officials, a supervisor of nobles and a priest during the reign of Unas, last pharaoh of the fifth dynasty. It was decorated with scenes of daily life.

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Another tomb belonged to Meri, “keeper of the secrets and assistant to the great leader of the palace”.

A statue is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A statue is displayed after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs, which have made a number of important archaeological discoveries dating to the fifth and sixth dynasties of the Old Kingdom, also stated that the expedition had found a group of Old Kingdom tombs, indicating that the site comprised a large cemetery, where the most important tomb belonged to Khnumdjedef, an inspector of the officials, a supervisor of the nobles, and a priest in the pyramid complex of Unas, the last kind of the fifth dynasty, in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Numerous statues were found among the tombs, including one representing a man and his wife and several servants, the statement said.

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

A general view inside a tomb after the announcement of the discovery of 4,300-year-old sealed tombs in Egypt’s Saqqara necropolis, in Giza, Egypt, January 26, 2023. Photo: Reuters

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/international/20230127/archaeologist-hails-possibly-oldest-mummy-yet-found-in-egypt/71141.html

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