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Kindergarten teacher suspended for allegedly stabbing students in northern Vietnam

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A kindergarten teacher in Thai Binh Province, northern Vietnam has been suspended since Wednesday amidst accusations from parents that she had stabbed students with sharp objects.

Nguyen Thi Tuyet, principal of Ky Ba – Fairy Dream 2 Kindergarten in the province’s Thai Binh City, where the incident happened, said that the suspension of P.T.T.T., 26, was meant to facilitate a police investigation into the case.

The school management board promptly asked local police to investigate accusations made online by parents of students in Sunny 1 class that their children had been stabbed by T. with needles or thorns, according to Tuyet. 

At the same time, the school convened a meeting with parents to collect their accounts of the incident.

So far, all of the school’s camera footage and related documents have been shared with police officers for use during the investigation, Tuyet said.

“Although the incident remains unclear, we would like to sincerely apologize to parents for the worries that have been caused over their children,” the principal added.

On Wednesday, the People’s Committee of Thai Binh Province also ordered the police unit and the education administration division of Thai Binh City to handle the case.

Ky Ba – Fairy Dream 2 Kindergarten officially opened for operation in mid-2022.

It currently hosts 180 children. 

Class Sunny 1 has 25 children and three teachers.

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Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/education/20220922/kindergarten-teacher-suspended-for-allegedly-stabbing-students-in-northern-vietnam/69200.html

Education

Vietnamese mathematician granted Clay Research Fellowship

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Pham Tuan Huy has become the second Vietnamese mathematician after famed Professor Ngo Bao Chau to receive a research fellowship from the Clay Mathematics Institute.

The Clay Mathematics Institute officially announced two mathematicians who will be awarded research fellowships in 2023, including Paul Minter, who obtained his PhD in 2022 at the University of Cambridge, and Pham Tuan Huy, who is about to receive his PhD from Stanford University.

Both Minter and Huy will be Clay Research Fellows starting July 1.

The appointment term of Minter is four years while Huy’s is five years.

On the website of the Clay Mathematics Institute, Huy is introduced as a highly inventive and prolific researcher who has already made fundamental contributions to combinatorics, probability, number theory, and theoretical computer science.

The 27-year-old is the second Vietnamese mathematician to receive a research fellowship from the Clay Mathematics Institute after famed Professor Ngo Bao Chau in 2004.

On August 19, 2010, Prof. Chau became the first Vietnamese ever to win the Fields Medal, the world’s most prestigious award in mathematics. 

Huy previously won the gold medals at the International Mathematics Olympiad (IMO) twice in 2013 and 2014.

Pham Tuan Huy and his father Pham Chau Tuan in this photo taken when Huy was a high school student. File photo: Tuoi Tre

Pham Tuan Huy and his father Pham Chau Tuan in this photo taken when Huy was a high school student. File photo: Tuoi Tre

“We are very happy because Huy’s dream has come true,” Pham Chau Tuan, Huy’s father, told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper.

“I hope this achievement will inspire and motivate the passion for mathematics among high school students in Vietnam.”

The Clay Mathematical Institute is a well-known private American foundation established in 1998 to honor mathematical talents and to fund people with the potential to become the world’s top mathematicians.

The Clay Research Fellowships are awarded to about two to three mathematicians each year.

Candidates for the fellowships are those who have recently received their PhD or have completed their thesis and are about to obtain the degree.

Each fellowship typically lasts a maximum of five years, depending on when the candidate’s PhD was obtained.

The main selection criteria for the fellowship is the exceptional quality of the candidate’s research and the promise to become a leading mathematician in their field.

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Pham Tuan Huy has become the second Vietnamese mathematician after famed Professor Ngo Bao Chau to receive a research fellowship from the Clay Mathematics Institute.

The Clay Mathematics Institute officially announced two mathematicians who will be awarded research fellowships in 2023, including Paul Minter, who obtained his PhD in 2022 at the University of Cambridge, and Pham Tuan Huy, who is about to receive his PhD from Stanford University.

Both Minter and Huy will be Clay Research Fellows starting July 1.

The appointment term of Minter is four years while Huy’s is five years.

On the website of the Clay Mathematics Institute, Huy is introduced as a highly inventive and prolific researcher who has already made fundamental contributions to combinatorics, probability, number theory, and theoretical computer science.

The 27-year-old is the second Vietnamese mathematician to receive a research fellowship from the Clay Mathematics Institute after famed Professor Ngo Bao Chau in 2004.

On August 19, 2010, Prof. Chau became the first Vietnamese ever to win the Fields Medal, the world’s most prestigious award in mathematics. 

Huy previously won the gold medals at the International Mathematics Olympiad (IMO) twice in 2013 and 2014.

Pham Tuan Huy and his father Pham Chau Tuan in this photo taken when Huy was a high school student. File photo: Tuoi Tre

Pham Tuan Huy and his father Pham Chau Tuan in this photo taken when Huy was a high school student. File photo: Tuoi Tre

“We are very happy because Huy’s dream has come true,” Pham Chau Tuan, Huy’s father, told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper.

“I hope this achievement will inspire and motivate the passion for mathematics among high school students in Vietnam.”

The Clay Mathematical Institute is a well-known private American foundation established in 1998 to honor mathematical talents and to fund people with the potential to become the world’s top mathematicians.

The Clay Research Fellowships are awarded to about two to three mathematicians each year.

Candidates for the fellowships are those who have recently received their PhD or have completed their thesis and are about to obtain the degree.

Each fellowship typically lasts a maximum of five years, depending on when the candidate’s PhD was obtained.

The main selection criteria for the fellowship is the exceptional quality of the candidate’s research and the promise to become a leading mathematician in their field.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/education/20230130/vietnamese-mathematician-granted-clay-research-fellowship/71221.html

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Vietnamese American teacher wins US prize for teen-centered job app

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Ben Hoang Nguyen, a Vietnamese American from Las Vegas, Nevada, the U.S. created an online platform that helps connect students with employers in their local communities.

Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School in Las Vegas, Nevada brought home a grand prize of US$200,000 from The Big Idea Challenge: A Competition for Educational Innovation hosted by Nevada-based nonprofits The Andre Agassi Foundation for Education and The Engelstad Foundation.

“This was an incredible experiment that gave everyone the opportunity to come forward to make things better,” Kris Engelstad, a trustee of the Engelstad Foundation, wrote on The Big Idea Challenge website.

“And indeed, so many Nevadans did just that. Our winners have embarked on a long journey to win and receive funding. We cannot wait to see all they do to take their ideas – and education in our state – to new heights.”

Julie Pippenger, chief operating officer of the Andre Agassi Foundation for Education, also lauded the competition and its contestants on the website, nothing that “This is just the beginning of a promising path for our winners. We will certainly cheer them on and be there for them. But in the meantime, it’s been wonderful to see their ideas develop and strengthen through this competition.”

Inspiring future careers

The Big Idea Challenge asked participants one simple question: “Who out there has an idea that can help take Nevada’s education landscape to the next level?”

Between January and March 2022, over 200 applicants submitted their answers to the question, but Nguyen’s idea to create a student-centered employment platform stood out to the judges.

According to Nguyen, his idea was a product of years spent working with high school students and recent high school graduates as they transitioned to higher education or long term careers. 

Through this work, Nguyen realized just how difficult it was for the young people he worked with, regardless of their graduation status, to find suitable jobs.

Putting his skills as an automation technology teacher and lead robotics coach at the high school to work, he began developing the idea for an online platform that could help these young people connect with employers in the local community.

What sets Nguyen’s platform apart from other job-hunting applications is its focus on training and career-advancement opportunities.

“I think one of the main differences that won over the judges of the competition was the emphasis on the education aspects and information delivery of the app.

“There are many different platforms around the world, and the difference of mine is [sic] the type of information displayed and shared with users, and the ability to visualize opportunities in their immediate area, including city, state, and one day national [sic],” Ben Nguyen told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper.

To better engage the young, people the application seeks to help, Nguyen has allowed employers to present job opportunities, especially entry-level positions, using videos, pictures, and other forms of media that are more attractive to young people. 

The platform also serves as a gateway for students who are unsure of how to begin certain careers.

For example, a student who wants to become an auto mechanic might be presented with featured companies in their search area and locations where they can receive training or take licensing exams.

This focus on engaging younger audiences and educating students on how to enter certain career tracks is the key difference that sets Nguyen’s platform apart from its competitors.

Ben Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School, one of three winners of The big idea challenge: An education innovation competition in a provided photo.
Ben Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School, one of three winners of The Big Idea Challenge: An education innovation competition in a provided photo.

Plans for the future

To use Nguyen’s platform, job hunters can create free accounts and use certain features, such as the map function, to identify opportunities in their desired industries and locations. Employers can also choose between free and subscription options.

Nguyen had already built the platform before winning his $200,000 grand prize, but will put the money towards hiring a team that can help him grow the platform and perfect its features ahead of its launch later this month. He also has plans to build a mobile version.

“I have a lot of big plans for the platform as it grows. I think ultimately, I want it to grow and adapt to the needs of the people who will be using it, namely high school students, college students and graduates, and people looking for new careers and opportunities.

“If I can execute the plan well in the state of Nevada, there are opportunities to go even further by adding more states and, one day, global partners,” Nguyen said.

Aspiring to be better

In 2019, his 6th year of teaching, Nguyen was awarded a Milken Educator Award – a prize awarded in recognition of teachers in the United States for their achievements.

Specifically, Nguyen was recognized for creating a creative classroom space at Sunrise Mountain High School which got students excited about learning STEM.

“I think, like a lot of people entering the teaching profession, there is a desire to do the best we can with what we have and with the students we get. My curiosity, combined with a drive for constant improvement, has helped me think and work extremely hard about both the big things and the small things, concerning many different issues in my life [sic].

“Through this approach, I have always allowed myself the freedom and creativity to pursue things I believe in, and I live my life in a way that is inspiring to my students, their families, the community, and beyond. Put simply – aspiring to be better,” said Nguyen.

Like us on Facebook or  follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Ben Hoang Nguyen, a Vietnamese American from Las Vegas, Nevada, the U.S. created an online platform that helps connect students with employers in their local communities.

Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School in Las Vegas, Nevada brought home a grand prize of US$200,000 from The Big Idea Challenge: A Competition for Educational Innovation hosted by Nevada-based nonprofits The Andre Agassi Foundation for Education and The Engelstad Foundation.

“This was an incredible experiment that gave everyone the opportunity to come forward to make things better,” Kris Engelstad, a trustee of the Engelstad Foundation, wrote on The Big Idea Challenge website.

“And indeed, so many Nevadans did just that. Our winners have embarked on a long journey to win and receive funding. We cannot wait to see all they do to take their ideas – and education in our state – to new heights.”

Julie Pippenger, chief operating officer of the Andre Agassi Foundation for Education, also lauded the competition and its contestants on the website, nothing that “This is just the beginning of a promising path for our winners. We will certainly cheer them on and be there for them. But in the meantime, it’s been wonderful to see their ideas develop and strengthen through this competition.”

Inspiring future careers

The Big Idea Challenge asked participants one simple question: “Who out there has an idea that can help take Nevada’s education landscape to the next level?”

Between January and March 2022, over 200 applicants submitted their answers to the question, but Nguyen’s idea to create a student-centered employment platform stood out to the judges.

According to Nguyen, his idea was a product of years spent working with high school students and recent high school graduates as they transitioned to higher education or long term careers. 

Through this work, Nguyen realized just how difficult it was for the young people he worked with, regardless of their graduation status, to find suitable jobs.

Putting his skills as an automation technology teacher and lead robotics coach at the high school to work, he began developing the idea for an online platform that could help these young people connect with employers in the local community.

What sets Nguyen’s platform apart from other job-hunting applications is its focus on training and career-advancement opportunities.

“I think one of the main differences that won over the judges of the competition was the emphasis on the education aspects and information delivery of the app.

“There are many different platforms around the world, and the difference of mine is [sic] the type of information displayed and shared with users, and the ability to visualize opportunities in their immediate area, including city, state, and one day national [sic],” Ben Nguyen told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper.

To better engage the young, people the application seeks to help, Nguyen has allowed employers to present job opportunities, especially entry-level positions, using videos, pictures, and other forms of media that are more attractive to young people. 

The platform also serves as a gateway for students who are unsure of how to begin certain careers.

For example, a student who wants to become an auto mechanic might be presented with featured companies in their search area and locations where they can receive training or take licensing exams.

This focus on engaging younger audiences and educating students on how to enter certain career tracks is the key difference that sets Nguyen’s platform apart from its competitors.

Ben Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School, one of three winners of The big idea challenge: An education innovation competition in a provided photo.
Ben Nguyen, a teacher at Sunrise Mountain High School, one of three winners of The Big Idea Challenge: An education innovation competition in a provided photo.

Plans for the future

To use Nguyen’s platform, job hunters can create free accounts and use certain features, such as the map function, to identify opportunities in their desired industries and locations. Employers can also choose between free and subscription options.

Nguyen had already built the platform before winning his $200,000 grand prize, but will put the money towards hiring a team that can help him grow the platform and perfect its features ahead of its launch later this month. He also has plans to build a mobile version.

“I have a lot of big plans for the platform as it grows. I think ultimately, I want it to grow and adapt to the needs of the people who will be using it, namely high school students, college students and graduates, and people looking for new careers and opportunities.

“If I can execute the plan well in the state of Nevada, there are opportunities to go even further by adding more states and, one day, global partners,” Nguyen said.

Aspiring to be better

In 2019, his 6th year of teaching, Nguyen was awarded a Milken Educator Award – a prize awarded in recognition of teachers in the United States for their achievements.

Specifically, Nguyen was recognized for creating a creative classroom space at Sunrise Mountain High School which got students excited about learning STEM.

“I think, like a lot of people entering the teaching profession, there is a desire to do the best we can with what we have and with the students we get. My curiosity, combined with a drive for constant improvement, has helped me think and work extremely hard about both the big things and the small things, concerning many different issues in my life [sic].

“Through this approach, I have always allowed myself the freedom and creativity to pursue things I believe in, and I live my life in a way that is inspiring to my students, their families, the community, and beyond. Put simply – aspiring to be better,” said Nguyen.

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Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/education/20230114/vietnamese-american-teacher-wins-us-prize-for-teencentered-job-app/70840.html

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​Vietnamese-American English teacher inspires local learners

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Bryan Tran, a Vietnamese-American currently teaching English in central Vietnam, has earned acclaim from his students for his tireless dedication to transforming his classroom into an exciting, practical language lab.

Thanks to the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) program, an initiative which places Fulbright scholarship recipients in classrooms with local English teachers, Vietnamese-American Bryan Tran has been able to touch the souls of English learners at Hue University School of Tourism for the past three months. 

In fact, Tran’s unique approach to teaching have led students at the university to dub his class a “party of English culture and language.”

Creativity in the classroom

“Teacher Bryan inspires the students in our class to learn English. Every lesson is so fun. He always teaches us very practical knowledge,” said Le Nguyen Quynh Thi, a student at Hue University School of Tourism.

“Many of us used to feel uncomfortable in English classes they were mainly about theory, but now we look forward to our classes each week,” Thi added.

Each of Tran’s classes are divided into two parts: theory and application through practical language exercises.

During the application portion of his classes, Tran encourages students to speak as much as possible by hosting fun activities that allow students to get in touch with their creativity. 

One of these activities, for example, involved asking students to take on the role of famous singers, such as Ariana Grande and Taylor Swift, to answer questions from “reporters” (their peers) on the red carpet.

“I often write the sentence model “I can…” to inspire the students,” Bryan said.

“At the end of the lesson, the students and I complete the sentence with what we learned and [discuss] what we need to improve in subsequent lessons.”

Outside of the classroom, Tran connects with his students over occasional outings and dinners. 

During these meetings, however, his students transform into teachers as they explain, in English, how Vietnamese dishes are prepared and share interesting stories about Hue and Vietnamese culture.

Occasionally, Tran asks his students to take on the role of ‘tour guide’ and travel with him around the city and region to places such as downtown Hue, Lang Co Beach, Hoi An, and Da Nang.  During these experiences, the students give Tran detailed and compelling insights in English.

“Going home”

Born in New York, the United States, Tran learned Vietnamese from his parents despite living in an area with a relatively small Vietnamese community.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in French from Le Moyne College in New York before teaching French at the high school level.

He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in French and pedagogy at Middlebury College in Vermont.

Prior to joining the ETA program, Tran made a visit to Vietnam in 2018 to meet his extended family, who also live in Hue.

“At the time, I did not understand much about Vietnam, but I burst into tears [sic] when I had to return to the U.S.,” he shared.

“It could be that I share a special connection with Vietnam. I felt compelled to return to Vietnam one day, not just for a short trip, but to live and work in the country,” Bryan explained.

Four years later, as fate would have it, Bryan found himself back in Hue, this time as a teacher. ETA participants do not get to choose their placement, making it even more surprising that Tran was fortunate enough to be placed near his family in Hue.

For Tran, working in Vietnam feels like “going home” because it allows him the opportunity to live for a short time in the place where his parents were born and raised.

He has been able to meet his Vietnamese relatives and become better acquainted with the Hue accent, a unique experience that would have been impossible had he stayed in the U.S.

Bryan feels that he grew up quite a bit during his first three months of working in Vietnam. He has learned more about his parents’ hometown and moved one step closer to finding out who he truly was.

As an added bonus, he learned how to drive a motorcycle and added dozens of words to his Vietnamese vocabulary.

“Until May 2023, when I return to my home country, I want to spend as much time as possible teaching and helping my students speak English,” Bryan said.

“I also plan to take the time to visit tourist attractions in Vietnam and build more community connections here,” he added.

Cultural ambassadors connecting Vietnam with the US

The Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) is managed by the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi’s Fulbright Program. Launched in 2008, the ETA sends English assistant teachers to high schools, colleges, and universities in cities and provinces other than Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

The assistant teachers spend a year giving lectures on listening comprehension and speaking and help local schools with their English teaching methods. They are also cultural ambassadors to Vietnam.

A new wave of wind

Professor Dam Le Tan Anh, a lecturer at Hue College School of Tourism, spoke highly of Bryan Tran, noting that he has brought a “new wind” to the classroom and that he is creative and enthusiastic.

Tran inspires his students to try new things and actively overcome personal adversity while learning English.

Like us on Facebook or  follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Bryan Tran, a Vietnamese-American currently teaching English in central Vietnam, has earned acclaim from his students for his tireless dedication to transforming his classroom into an exciting, practical language lab.

Thanks to the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) program, an initiative which places Fulbright scholarship recipients in classrooms with local English teachers, Vietnamese-American Bryan Tran has been able to touch the souls of English learners at Hue University School of Tourism for the past three months. 

In fact, Tran’s unique approach to teaching have led students at the university to dub his class a “party of English culture and language.”

Creativity in the classroom

“Teacher Bryan inspires the students in our class to learn English. Every lesson is so fun. He always teaches us very practical knowledge,” said Le Nguyen Quynh Thi, a student at Hue University School of Tourism.

“Many of us used to feel uncomfortable in English classes they were mainly about theory, but now we look forward to our classes each week,” Thi added.

Each of Tran’s classes are divided into two parts: theory and application through practical language exercises.

During the application portion of his classes, Tran encourages students to speak as much as possible by hosting fun activities that allow students to get in touch with their creativity. 

One of these activities, for example, involved asking students to take on the role of famous singers, such as Ariana Grande and Taylor Swift, to answer questions from “reporters” (their peers) on the red carpet.

“I often write the sentence model “I can…” to inspire the students,” Bryan said.

“At the end of the lesson, the students and I complete the sentence with what we learned and [discuss] what we need to improve in subsequent lessons.”

Outside of the classroom, Tran connects with his students over occasional outings and dinners. 

During these meetings, however, his students transform into teachers as they explain, in English, how Vietnamese dishes are prepared and share interesting stories about Hue and Vietnamese culture.

Occasionally, Tran asks his students to take on the role of ‘tour guide’ and travel with him around the city and region to places such as downtown Hue, Lang Co Beach, Hoi An, and Da Nang.  During these experiences, the students give Tran detailed and compelling insights in English.

“Going home”

Born in New York, the United States, Tran learned Vietnamese from his parents despite living in an area with a relatively small Vietnamese community.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in French from Le Moyne College in New York before teaching French at the high school level.

He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in French and pedagogy at Middlebury College in Vermont.

Prior to joining the ETA program, Tran made a visit to Vietnam in 2018 to meet his extended family, who also live in Hue.

“At the time, I did not understand much about Vietnam, but I burst into tears [sic] when I had to return to the U.S.,” he shared.

“It could be that I share a special connection with Vietnam. I felt compelled to return to Vietnam one day, not just for a short trip, but to live and work in the country,” Bryan explained.

Four years later, as fate would have it, Bryan found himself back in Hue, this time as a teacher. ETA participants do not get to choose their placement, making it even more surprising that Tran was fortunate enough to be placed near his family in Hue.

For Tran, working in Vietnam feels like “going home” because it allows him the opportunity to live for a short time in the place where his parents were born and raised.

He has been able to meet his Vietnamese relatives and become better acquainted with the Hue accent, a unique experience that would have been impossible had he stayed in the U.S.

Bryan feels that he grew up quite a bit during his first three months of working in Vietnam. He has learned more about his parents’ hometown and moved one step closer to finding out who he truly was.

As an added bonus, he learned how to drive a motorcycle and added dozens of words to his Vietnamese vocabulary.

“Until May 2023, when I return to my home country, I want to spend as much time as possible teaching and helping my students speak English,” Bryan said.

“I also plan to take the time to visit tourist attractions in Vietnam and build more community connections here,” he added.

Cultural ambassadors connecting Vietnam with the US

The Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) is managed by the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi’s Fulbright Program. Launched in 2008, the ETA sends English assistant teachers to high schools, colleges, and universities in cities and provinces other than Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

The assistant teachers spend a year giving lectures on listening comprehension and speaking and help local schools with their English teaching methods. They are also cultural ambassadors to Vietnam.

A new wave of wind

Professor Dam Le Tan Anh, a lecturer at Hue College School of Tourism, spoke highly of Bryan Tran, noting that he has brought a “new wind” to the classroom and that he is creative and enthusiastic.

Tran inspires his students to try new things and actively overcome personal adversity while learning English.

Like us on Facebook or  follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/education/20221224/vietnameseamerican-english-teacher-inspires-local-english-learners/70540.html

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