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Việt Nam calls for implementation of climate finance commitments

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Việt Nam’s Mekong Delta is facing rising seawater levels due to climate change. — VNA/ Photo

HÀ NỘI — A Vietnamese diplomat has underlined the importance of ensuring equality and justice in climate change response, with climate finance commitments being fully implemented based on common but differentiated responsibility.

Lê Thị Minh Thoa, Deputy Permanent Representative of Việt Nam to the UN, made the comments while attending a meeting held by the UN Security Council (UNSC) on Wednesday to discuss climate finance for sustaining peace and security.

She shared other countries’ concerns over climate change challenges that have rendered tens of millions of people homeless and worsened transboundary security challenges, especially in conflict-hit regions.

The diplomat pointed out the need to fully consider the demand and priorities of developing countries, particularly those affected by conflicts, appealing for stronger partnership and coordination in the UN system to solve climate change issues.

Thoa also voiced Việt Nam’s support for the UNSC to continue discussing climate security and the role of climate finance in conflict prevention, peacekeeping, humanitarian aid, and post-conflict reconstruction.

As one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change, Việt Nam has been exerting efforts to minimise adverse impacts of this global phenomenon and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, the diplomat stressed, adding that it pledged to continue joining international efforts and promote partnership and climate finance for climate change response.

At the meeting, participants looked into the challenge of implementing climate finance commitments to help with conflict prevention, stability maintenance, and peacebuilding. They said that the climate finance mobilisation had fallen short of targets while the international community’s aid for peacebuilding and climate risk management remained modest.

Most participants said they supported the UNSC to comprehensively approach and solve these issues, with climate finance taken into account.

Some urged the UNSC to soon reach a consensus to resolve security challenges caused by climate change. —

Source: https://vietnamnews.vn/politics-laws/1163498/viet-nam-calls-for-implementation-of-climate-finance-commitments.html

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UK joining CPTPP a fundamental change to the bloc: minister

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UK Minister of International Trade Greg Hands visited Vietnam on Wednesday to explore trade cooperation opportunities between the two countries. His visit came amidst the UK’s pursuit of full membership in the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) in 2023.

Vietnam is the first stop on the minister’s three-day trip to three Southeast Asian countries, all of which are founding members of the partnership.

During an exclusive interview with Tuoi Tre News, Hands emphasized what the UK can offer the CPTPP, as well as discussed the UK’s strong strategic partnership with Vietnam.

In a speech at Lancaster House on January 23, UK Trade Secretary Kemi Badenoch outlined five priorities for trade. What are your priorities as the Minister of State for Trade Policy?

My personal priorities are, first, to get the UK into the CPTPP. Vietnam will play a crucial role in that progress. My second priority is to do a free trade agreement with India this year, which is also another important part of our work with [India’s] huge economy.

The third area is removing trade barriers around the world to make sure that British goods and services can more easily enter markets anywhere in the world, including Vietnam.

The fourth priority is doing more work in the United States, particularly through state-level memoranda of understanding with individual U.S. states. Those are like mini-arrangements to improve the flow of services between the UK and individual U.S. states.

UK Trade Secretary Kemi Badenoch said she wants to seal high-quality deals with India and the CPTPP. Can you tell us about the UK’s aspiration to join the CPTPP and give an update on its progress? How does Vietnam fit into that journey?

The UK joining the CPTPP will be a major move. The UK will be the first country in the world to join the CPTPP and its 11 founding members. The UK joining would fundamentally change the CPTPP, which is currently about 12 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP). With the UK, that number will rise to 15.5 percent. It also changes the geography of the CPTPP, which is currently a Pacific Rim trade agreement. 

The UK joining the CPTPP would make it a global agreement – a global plurilateral agreement that would include pro-free trade countries. It is a huge opportunity for Vietnam as a founding member. We’ll be setting global free trade rules of the future. The CPTPP is a very good agreement because it removes more than 99 percent of tariffs. It offers liberal regulations in terms of rules of origin, data, digital trade. These are all important things for both the UK and Vietnam.

I think we’re nearing a conclusion to the process of joining the CPTPP. We are looking for a further round [of talks] in February and we hope that will clear up the remaining issues that are still out there. We’ve made a lot of progress. We, of course, understand the very high standards of the CPTPP and that they want to keep those high standards. The UK believes that the CPTPP has a great future ahead with those standards and that the UK can fulfill [those standards]. 

Do you have an expected timeline for the UK joining the CPTPP?

We just want to make it as quickly as possible. There’s still a negotiation ahead. I don’t really have a time limit for that negotiation. I think, given the interest of other countries and other parties in joining [the CPTPP], getting the UK in will enable the CPTPP member parties to move forward with other applications.

The UK is the fifth-largest economy in the world, and it wants to be a part of the CPTPP. Have you seen any obstacles during your negotiations?

Like every trade negotiation, there’re always some issues. The CPTPP is a bit different because it’s an existing agreement. We are not negotiating from scratch. Therefore, there’ll be some things that the UK needs to look at very carefully. There will be some areas where CPTPP parties will look very carefully at what the UK’s position is. So, it’s not a straightforward negotiation, but I think that CPTPP parties can be rest assured that the UK has very high standards and is very keen to join and to grow the CPTPP. 

Recently, the UK joined hands with the U.S in exporting control chips to China, which is also seeking membership in the CPTPP. Would there be any issues between China and the UK if both countries become CPTPP members?

We are not members of the CPTPP now, so it’s not right for the UK to comment on other countries joining in the future because we ourselves are not members. It’ll be a matter for whoever are the members of the CPTPP at the time. 

The UK, like many other countries, is looking at its supply chains and looking at the security of those supply chains. In relation to semiconductors, it is making sure that those supply chains are robust and have good access to semiconductors of different types. So, that is work the UK is doing and other countries are doing as well – ensuring that the security of their supply chains remains strong.

You might not be able to comment on other countries’ bids for joining the CPTPP, but last year you visited Taiwan, and Taiwan and China are both seeking membership in the CPTPP. So, if the UK becomes a member of the CPTPP first, which would allow it a vote to admit new parties, what would happen?

That’s a hypothetical question. Right now, we have to focus on the UK joining and I think it’s also strongly in Vietnam’s interest for the UK to join. We want Vietnam to be our best friend in the world trading system. I think Vietnam supports the UK because your country wants to grow the size of the agreement. Vietnam will then be right at the center of a growing movement for global free trade.

Vietnam is reporting a trade surplus with the UK. What are the pros and cons of this and how can we resolve any problems that arise in the future between the UK and Vietnam?

I don’t think there will be any trouble. We do about £6 billion [US$7.3 billion] of trade with Vietnam now. I think there’s big potential for growth for UK exporters to Vietnam. That figure shows huge potential. We think that we can sell more quality UK expertise, such as education, renewable energy, and financial services. The UK is very good at these three things, which I think Vietnam has a big demand for, particularly as you move toward net-zero emissions by 2050. The need for English language education is very strong in Vietnam. The UK, obviously, is the world’s best provider of English language education, and London has incredible capability in financial services. 

In terms of Vietnam selling to the UK, the obvious growth is agriculture exports thanks to the free trade agreement between us which came into effect in 2021. There has been a substantial rise in quota. Vietnam does not sell more rice, electronics, and footwear. Vietnam is gradually moving up the value chain with more complex products, more services, and more advanced technology products.

The trade agreement has gone well. I think quite a few people are used to using it and finding it helpful. I’ve not heard any complaints from any companies about how it’s working. We can always make sure that the UK government and the Vietnamese government engage to improve trade between us. That’s why I am here.

This year, we celebrate 50 years of diplomatic relations. What’s your vision for the future of the UK-Vietnam relationship?

The UK and Vietnam are natural partners. We’re good fits for each other. We have a common view on global free trade. 

It’s a fantastic achievement to have 50 years of diplomatic relations. We’ve done a lot of work. I have done a lot of work and a lot of people have done a lot of work to make sure that we get to a better place. We want to make sure that Vietnam’s energy system is resilient to be sustainable. 

The UK has the world’s largest installed offshore wind capacity and that is the expertise that we are looking to bring to Vietnam, which has got amazing resources to be able to use offshore wind. People-to-people contact is important too. A large number of Vietnamese students are studying in British universities. British schools and universities are setting up here. I went to one in Da Nang a few years ago. 

The strategic partnership was signed in 2010. I was here with the foreign secretary in 2020 to move that strategic partnership to the next 10 years. Now, it is still a very, very strong strategic partnership. That relationship is built on trade, on energy cooperation, on education, financial services, food and drinks being exchanged between our two countries. It will be a strong foundation for another 50 years of UK-Vietnam diplomatic relations.

Thank you for the discussion!

Like us on Facebook or  follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

UK Minister of International Trade Greg Hands visited Vietnam on Wednesday to explore trade cooperation opportunities between the two countries. His visit came amidst the UK’s pursuit of full membership in the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) in 2023.

Vietnam is the first stop on the minister’s three-day trip to three Southeast Asian countries, all of which are founding members of the partnership.

During an exclusive interview with Tuoi Tre News, Hands emphasized what the UK can offer the CPTPP, as well as discussed the UK’s strong strategic partnership with Vietnam.

In a speech at Lancaster House on January 23, UK Trade Secretary Kemi Badenoch outlined five priorities for trade. What are your priorities as the Minister of State for Trade Policy?

My personal priorities are, first, to get the UK into the CPTPP. Vietnam will play a crucial role in that progress. My second priority is to do a free trade agreement with India this year, which is also another important part of our work with [India’s] huge economy.

The third area is removing trade barriers around the world to make sure that British goods and services can more easily enter markets anywhere in the world, including Vietnam.

The fourth priority is doing more work in the United States, particularly through state-level memoranda of understanding with individual U.S. states. Those are like mini-arrangements to improve the flow of services between the UK and individual U.S. states.

UK Trade Secretary Kemi Badenoch said she wants to seal high-quality deals with India and the CPTPP. Can you tell us about the UK’s aspiration to join the CPTPP and give an update on its progress? How does Vietnam fit into that journey?

The UK joining the CPTPP will be a major move. The UK will be the first country in the world to join the CPTPP and its 11 founding members. The UK joining would fundamentally change the CPTPP, which is currently about 12 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP). With the UK, that number will rise to 15.5 percent. It also changes the geography of the CPTPP, which is currently a Pacific Rim trade agreement. 

The UK joining the CPTPP would make it a global agreement – a global plurilateral agreement that would include pro-free trade countries. It is a huge opportunity for Vietnam as a founding member. We’ll be setting global free trade rules of the future. The CPTPP is a very good agreement because it removes more than 99 percent of tariffs. It offers liberal regulations in terms of rules of origin, data, digital trade. These are all important things for both the UK and Vietnam.

I think we’re nearing a conclusion to the process of joining the CPTPP. We are looking for a further round [of talks] in February and we hope that will clear up the remaining issues that are still out there. We’ve made a lot of progress. We, of course, understand the very high standards of the CPTPP and that they want to keep those high standards. The UK believes that the CPTPP has a great future ahead with those standards and that the UK can fulfill [those standards]. 

Do you have an expected timeline for the UK joining the CPTPP?

We just want to make it as quickly as possible. There’s still a negotiation ahead. I don’t really have a time limit for that negotiation. I think, given the interest of other countries and other parties in joining [the CPTPP], getting the UK in will enable the CPTPP member parties to move forward with other applications.

The UK is the fifth-largest economy in the world, and it wants to be a part of the CPTPP. Have you seen any obstacles during your negotiations?

Like every trade negotiation, there’re always some issues. The CPTPP is a bit different because it’s an existing agreement. We are not negotiating from scratch. Therefore, there’ll be some things that the UK needs to look at very carefully. There will be some areas where CPTPP parties will look very carefully at what the UK’s position is. So, it’s not a straightforward negotiation, but I think that CPTPP parties can be rest assured that the UK has very high standards and is very keen to join and to grow the CPTPP. 

Recently, the UK joined hands with the U.S in exporting control chips to China, which is also seeking membership in the CPTPP. Would there be any issues between China and the UK if both countries become CPTPP members?

We are not members of the CPTPP now, so it’s not right for the UK to comment on other countries joining in the future because we ourselves are not members. It’ll be a matter for whoever are the members of the CPTPP at the time. 

The UK, like many other countries, is looking at its supply chains and looking at the security of those supply chains. In relation to semiconductors, it is making sure that those supply chains are robust and have good access to semiconductors of different types. So, that is work the UK is doing and other countries are doing as well – ensuring that the security of their supply chains remains strong.

You might not be able to comment on other countries’ bids for joining the CPTPP, but last year you visited Taiwan, and Taiwan and China are both seeking membership in the CPTPP. So, if the UK becomes a member of the CPTPP first, which would allow it a vote to admit new parties, what would happen?

That’s a hypothetical question. Right now, we have to focus on the UK joining and I think it’s also strongly in Vietnam’s interest for the UK to join. We want Vietnam to be our best friend in the world trading system. I think Vietnam supports the UK because your country wants to grow the size of the agreement. Vietnam will then be right at the center of a growing movement for global free trade.

Vietnam is reporting a trade surplus with the UK. What are the pros and cons of this and how can we resolve any problems that arise in the future between the UK and Vietnam?

I don’t think there will be any trouble. We do about £6 billion [US$7.3 billion] of trade with Vietnam now. I think there’s big potential for growth for UK exporters to Vietnam. That figure shows huge potential. We think that we can sell more quality UK expertise, such as education, renewable energy, and financial services. The UK is very good at these three things, which I think Vietnam has a big demand for, particularly as you move toward net-zero emissions by 2050. The need for English language education is very strong in Vietnam. The UK, obviously, is the world’s best provider of English language education, and London has incredible capability in financial services. 

In terms of Vietnam selling to the UK, the obvious growth is agriculture exports thanks to the free trade agreement between us which came into effect in 2021. There has been a substantial rise in quota. Vietnam does not sell more rice, electronics, and footwear. Vietnam is gradually moving up the value chain with more complex products, more services, and more advanced technology products.

The trade agreement has gone well. I think quite a few people are used to using it and finding it helpful. I’ve not heard any complaints from any companies about how it’s working. We can always make sure that the UK government and the Vietnamese government engage to improve trade between us. That’s why I am here.

This year, we celebrate 50 years of diplomatic relations. What’s your vision for the future of the UK-Vietnam relationship?

The UK and Vietnam are natural partners. We’re good fits for each other. We have a common view on global free trade. 

It’s a fantastic achievement to have 50 years of diplomatic relations. We’ve done a lot of work. I have done a lot of work and a lot of people have done a lot of work to make sure that we get to a better place. We want to make sure that Vietnam’s energy system is resilient to be sustainable. 

The UK has the world’s largest installed offshore wind capacity and that is the expertise that we are looking to bring to Vietnam, which has got amazing resources to be able to use offshore wind. People-to-people contact is important too. A large number of Vietnamese students are studying in British universities. British schools and universities are setting up here. I went to one in Da Nang a few years ago. 

The strategic partnership was signed in 2010. I was here with the foreign secretary in 2020 to move that strategic partnership to the next 10 years. Now, it is still a very, very strong strategic partnership. That relationship is built on trade, on energy cooperation, on education, financial services, food and drinks being exchanged between our two countries. It will be a strong foundation for another 50 years of UK-Vietnam diplomatic relations.

Thank you for the discussion!

Like us on Facebook or  follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/politics/20230203/uk-joining-cptpp-a-fundamental-change-to-the-bloc-uk-minister/71295.html

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Vietnam, S.Korea aim to boost bilateral trade to $100bn this year

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Vietnam and South Korea have agreed to promote two-way trade to US$100 billion within this year and $150 billion by 2030 in a more sustainable and balanced manner by making the best use of existing bilateral and multilateral trade deals.

The agreement was reached on Tuesday during the talks between Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh and South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo, who is on a visit to Vietnam at the invitation of Vietnam’s National Assembly Chairman Vuong Dinh Hue, the Vietnam Government Portal reported.

The two sides expressed their pleasure that the two countries’ relations have fruitfully developed in all fields after 30 years of establishing diplomatic relations.

In the context of rapid and complicated changes in the world and regional situation, including the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the relationship between the two countries continues to maintain a stable development momentum, and the mutual political trust has been continuously strengthened.

Currently, South Korea holds the number-one position in foreign direct investment in Vietnam with a total capital of US$80.5 billion, with about 8,000 enterprises doing business in the Southeast Asia nation.

The Northeast Asian country also ranks second in development, tourism, and labor cooperation, and third in terms of trade cooperation with Vietnam, with a trade value of $88 billion in 2022.

Despite the heavy impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, both countries gained a two-way trade turnover of $80.6 billion in 2021, much higher than the $500 million recorded 30 years ago, South Korean Consul General in Da Nang Ahn Min Sik said at a seminar last year.

Based on such a good outcome, the host and guest agreed to boost two-way trade to $100 billion this year and $150 billion seven years later, in a balanced and sustainable way, based on the effective implementation of the Vietnam – Korea Bilateral Free Trade Agreement (VKFTA) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

PM Chinh asked the South Korean government to streamline the entry of Vietnamese agricultural and aquatic products, seafood, and seasonal fruits into the South Korean market.

He also proposed the two sides strengthen stable, long-term, and sustainable goods exchange, and strive to balance their trade because currently South Korea has a trade surplus. 

The Vietnamese government chief affirmed that Vietnam welcomes South Korean businesses to expand their investment in Vietnam, especially in science, technology, innovation, green economy, digital economy, digital transformation, clean energy, smart city, and ecological urbanism.

Vietnam always considers South Korea an important and long-term strategic partner for the common interests of the two countries and peoples and for stability and peace in the region and the world, PM Chinh told his guest.

A meeting between the two delegations of South Korea and Vietnam led by South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo and Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh, respectively, in Hanoi on January 17, 2023. Photo: Vietnam Government Portal

A meeting between the two delegations of South Korea and Vietnam led by South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo and Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh, respectively, in Hanoi on January 17, 2023. Photo: Vietnam Government Portal

The host congratulated South Korea on its achievements in national construction and development and extended his thanks to its state, National Assembly, and people for always giving valuable, practical, and effective support to Vietnam in the past time.

Speaker Kim praised Vietnam for continuing to have high and solid economic growth in difficult conditions and wished Vietnam to achieve its goal of becoming a developing country with modern industry and a high average income by 2030.

The guest thanked the Vietnamese government for always paying attention to the development of the South Korean business community in Vietnam.

He said that PM Chinh previously had two dialogues with South Korean businesses to listen to their opinions and remove obstacles facing them in Vietnam.

Kim wished that the Vietnamese government would support South Korea to host the 2030 World Expo (World Expo 2030) in Busan, continue to create favorable conditions for Korean enterprises to operate effectively in Vietnam and for South Korean citizens to travel, do business, and live in the Southeast Asian country.

He also proposed that Hanoi cooperate with Seoul in rare earth production, and support the expansion of South Korean educational institutions in Vietnam.

PM Chinh wished South Korea would continue to provide ODA for Vietnam, expand the admission of Vietnamese workers in nursing, information technology, healthcare, and soon implement the Social Insurance Agreement between Vietnam and South Korea, contributing to ensuring the rights of workers in each country.

Vietnam will create all favorable conditions for the South Korean community to live, study, and work stably in Vietnam, PM Chinh said, adding he hoped the South Korean government would continue to support and protect the legitimate interests of Vietnamese nationals who are living and doing business in South Korea.

The Vietnamese government chief suggested the two sides promote effective cooperation in all fields within the framework of their ‘Comprehensive Strategic Partnership’ announced in December last year, including South Korea’s assistance for Vietnam to improve the capability of its law enforcement at sea. 

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Vietnam and South Korea have agreed to promote two-way trade to US$100 billion within this year and $150 billion by 2030 in a more sustainable and balanced manner by making the best use of existing bilateral and multilateral trade deals.

The agreement was reached on Tuesday during the talks between Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh and South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo, who is on a visit to Vietnam at the invitation of Vietnam’s National Assembly Chairman Vuong Dinh Hue, the Vietnam Government Portal reported.

The two sides expressed their pleasure that the two countries’ relations have fruitfully developed in all fields after 30 years of establishing diplomatic relations.

In the context of rapid and complicated changes in the world and regional situation, including the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the relationship between the two countries continues to maintain a stable development momentum, and the mutual political trust has been continuously strengthened.

Currently, South Korea holds the number-one position in foreign direct investment in Vietnam with a total capital of US$80.5 billion, with about 8,000 enterprises doing business in the Southeast Asia nation.

The Northeast Asian country also ranks second in development, tourism, and labor cooperation, and third in terms of trade cooperation with Vietnam, with a trade value of $88 billion in 2022.

Despite the heavy impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, both countries gained a two-way trade turnover of $80.6 billion in 2021, much higher than the $500 million recorded 30 years ago, South Korean Consul General in Da Nang Ahn Min Sik said at a seminar last year.

Based on such a good outcome, the host and guest agreed to boost two-way trade to $100 billion this year and $150 billion seven years later, in a balanced and sustainable way, based on the effective implementation of the Vietnam – Korea Bilateral Free Trade Agreement (VKFTA) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

PM Chinh asked the South Korean government to streamline the entry of Vietnamese agricultural and aquatic products, seafood, and seasonal fruits into the South Korean market.

He also proposed the two sides strengthen stable, long-term, and sustainable goods exchange, and strive to balance their trade because currently South Korea has a trade surplus. 

The Vietnamese government chief affirmed that Vietnam welcomes South Korean businesses to expand their investment in Vietnam, especially in science, technology, innovation, green economy, digital economy, digital transformation, clean energy, smart city, and ecological urbanism.

Vietnam always considers South Korea an important and long-term strategic partner for the common interests of the two countries and peoples and for stability and peace in the region and the world, PM Chinh told his guest.

A meeting between the two delegations of South Korea and Vietnam led by South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo and Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh, respectively, in Hanoi on January 17, 2023. Photo: Vietnam Government Portal

A meeting between the two delegations of South Korea and Vietnam led by South Korean Speaker Kim Jin-pyo and Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh, respectively, in Hanoi on January 17, 2023. Photo: Vietnam Government Portal

The host congratulated South Korea on its achievements in national construction and development and extended his thanks to its state, National Assembly, and people for always giving valuable, practical, and effective support to Vietnam in the past time.

Speaker Kim praised Vietnam for continuing to have high and solid economic growth in difficult conditions and wished Vietnam to achieve its goal of becoming a developing country with modern industry and a high average income by 2030.

The guest thanked the Vietnamese government for always paying attention to the development of the South Korean business community in Vietnam.

He said that PM Chinh previously had two dialogues with South Korean businesses to listen to their opinions and remove obstacles facing them in Vietnam.

Kim wished that the Vietnamese government would support South Korea to host the 2030 World Expo (World Expo 2030) in Busan, continue to create favorable conditions for Korean enterprises to operate effectively in Vietnam and for South Korean citizens to travel, do business, and live in the Southeast Asian country.

He also proposed that Hanoi cooperate with Seoul in rare earth production, and support the expansion of South Korean educational institutions in Vietnam.

PM Chinh wished South Korea would continue to provide ODA for Vietnam, expand the admission of Vietnamese workers in nursing, information technology, healthcare, and soon implement the Social Insurance Agreement between Vietnam and South Korea, contributing to ensuring the rights of workers in each country.

Vietnam will create all favorable conditions for the South Korean community to live, study, and work stably in Vietnam, PM Chinh said, adding he hoped the South Korean government would continue to support and protect the legitimate interests of Vietnamese nationals who are living and doing business in South Korea.

The Vietnamese government chief suggested the two sides promote effective cooperation in all fields within the framework of their ‘Comprehensive Strategic Partnership’ announced in December last year, including South Korea’s assistance for Vietnam to improve the capability of its law enforcement at sea. 

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Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/politics/20230119/vietnam-skorea-aim-to-boost-bilateral-trade-to-100bn-this-year/71047.html

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Vietnam’s Vice-President Vo Thi Anh Xuan named acting head of state

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Vietnam’s Vice-State President Vo Thi Anh Xuan was appointed Acting State President of Vietnam on Wednesday following the resignation of State President Nguyen Xuan Phuc, according to the Vietnamese legislature’s announcement.

Xuan will remain Acting State President until the lawmaking National Assembly (NA) elects a new head of state, NA Chairman Vuong Dinh Hue said in a notice he signed on behalf of the NA Standing Committee on Wednesday.

The notice was released under Resolution No. 83/2023/QH15 adopted at the 15th NA’s third extraordinary meeting on the same day, pursuant to the Constitution and the Law on the Organization of the NA.

Xuan’s appointment came after the Vietnamese Party Central Committee (PCC) on Tuesday agreed to let Phuc retire and quit the posts of a member of the Politburo and of the 13th PCC upon his request.

He also left the position as chairman of the Council of National Defense and Security.

A similar designation previously happened when State President Tran Dai Quang died of illness in September 2018 and then-Vice State President Dang Thi Ngoc Thinh served as interim president.

Xuan, born in 1970 in southern An Giang Province, is a member of the 12th and 13th PCC.

With a bachelor’s degree in chemistry pedagogy and a master’s in public governance, Xuan used to work as a high school teacher in An Giang, and then a research specialist of the provincial Party Committee Office.

From August 2001 to January 2013, she worked as vice-president and then president of the An Giang Province Women’s Union, deputy head of the Provincial Party Committee’s Mass Mobilization Department, and secretary of the Party Committee of An Giang’s Tan Chau Town.

In February 2013, she was deputy chairwoman of the An Giang administration and then deputy secretary of the provincial Party Committee.

She became Party Committee secretary of An Giang in October 2015 before being voted as Vice-State President in April 2021.

Nguyen Xuan Phuc, while holding the post of the prime minister in the 2016-21 tenure, made great efforts in leading Vietnam’s COVID-19 pandemic prevention and control, gaining many important achievements.

However, he must take the political responsibility as the government chief when many high-ranking officials, including two deputy prime ministers and three ministers, committed violations and wrongdoings, causing serious consequences. 

Aware of his responsibility before the Party and the people, he handed in his resignation, which was accepted by the PCC.

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Vietnam’s Vice-State President Vo Thi Anh Xuan was appointed Acting State President of Vietnam on Wednesday following the resignation of State President Nguyen Xuan Phuc, according to the Vietnamese legislature’s announcement.

Xuan will remain Acting State President until the lawmaking National Assembly (NA) elects a new head of state, NA Chairman Vuong Dinh Hue said in a notice he signed on behalf of the NA Standing Committee on Wednesday.

The notice was released under Resolution No. 83/2023/QH15 adopted at the 15th NA’s third extraordinary meeting on the same day, pursuant to the Constitution and the Law on the Organization of the NA.

Xuan’s appointment came after the Vietnamese Party Central Committee (PCC) on Tuesday agreed to let Phuc retire and quit the posts of a member of the Politburo and of the 13th PCC upon his request.

He also left the position as chairman of the Council of National Defense and Security.

A similar designation previously happened when State President Tran Dai Quang died of illness in September 2018 and then-Vice State President Dang Thi Ngoc Thinh served as interim president.

Xuan, born in 1970 in southern An Giang Province, is a member of the 12th and 13th PCC.

With a bachelor’s degree in chemistry pedagogy and a master’s in public governance, Xuan used to work as a high school teacher in An Giang, and then a research specialist of the provincial Party Committee Office.

From August 2001 to January 2013, she worked as vice-president and then president of the An Giang Province Women’s Union, deputy head of the Provincial Party Committee’s Mass Mobilization Department, and secretary of the Party Committee of An Giang’s Tan Chau Town.

In February 2013, she was deputy chairwoman of the An Giang administration and then deputy secretary of the provincial Party Committee.

She became Party Committee secretary of An Giang in October 2015 before being voted as Vice-State President in April 2021.

Nguyen Xuan Phuc, while holding the post of the prime minister in the 2016-21 tenure, made great efforts in leading Vietnam’s COVID-19 pandemic prevention and control, gaining many important achievements.

However, he must take the political responsibility as the government chief when many high-ranking officials, including two deputy prime ministers and three ministers, committed violations and wrongdoings, causing serious consequences. 

Aware of his responsibility before the Party and the people, he handed in his resignation, which was accepted by the PCC.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Source: https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/politics/20230119/vietnams-vicepresident-vo-thi-anh-xuan-named-acting-head-of-state/71046.html

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